CFP: CCSWG18 (Jan 15-Feb 5, 2018; Jan 1)

Critical Code Studies Working Group 2018
Jan 15-Feb 5, 2018
Application Deadline (Jan 1)

Announcing the 5th biennial Critical Code Studies Working Group , Jan 15-Feb 5, 2018 online. CCSWG is the major online think tank for Critical Code Studies, a hub of dialogue and collaborative inquiry that generates major thrust in the reading of code. The threads from previous CCSWGs were published in electronic book review, and this year we are opening the forum itself to all, though only participants can post. Past discussions have led to books (10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10), essays, and conference panels. Join us for explorations for the intersections of computer source code and the humanities.

This year’s major topics include: creative and critical coding; identity in code; gender and feminism, race and ethnicity (specifically Black Code Studies), and sexuality in coding cultures.

Guest weekly leaders include: John Bell, Evan Buswell, Jessica Johnson, Judy Malloy, and Margaret Rhee.

To apply to join the working group, please fill out an application by Jan 1

Apply here.

You will need to include:

  • Name
  • Institutional Affiliation (if any)
  • One-sentence bio
  • Past work or study in code or Critical Code Studies
  • (Recommended) Proposed Code Critique thread or related discussion

A “code critique” is a segment of code (or entire program) you wish to offer for discussion by the working group. You can see examples of code critiques in these HASTAC threads.

Notice of acceptance will be given by Jan. 8.  Participants may be asked to be designated respondents.
CCSWG is sponsored by the Humanities and Critical Code Studies (HaCCS) Lab at the University of Southern California. http://haccslab.com (@haccs) and Digital Arts & Humanities Commons at UC Santa Barbara. http://dahc.ucsb.edu/
Coordinated by Jeremy Douglass (UCSB), Mark Marino (USC), Catherine Griffiths (USC), Ali Rachel Pearl (USC), and Teddy Roland (UCSB)

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Guest Poet: Jeremy Hight (Oct. 3, 2pm)

Jeremy_hightThe HaCCS Lab is proud to sponsor a guest visit from locative media pioneer, Jeremy Hight! He will be visiting the Monthly E-Lit Reading Group, presenting works and talking about the magic of making electronic literature.

jeremy_hight_bookJeremy Hight

October 3, 2pm

420 Taper Hall (Ide Commons Room)

I am the Ghost Here

Jeremy Hight has an MFA in Creative Writing from Cal Arts.  He co-created the early Locative Narrative work 34 North 118 West and the code edited text and image work “Carrizo Parkfield Diaries.”  He collaborated with Mark Skwarek and created Augmented Reality poetry and poetics. He is currently making poems from random gifs people post on Facebook, a novel and several collaborative e-lit and text and image projects.  He has published two books of experimental prose. The first (I Am The Ghost Here)  is a collection of literary fiction and noir composed from elements of social media. The second (What Remains)  is a collection of short stories written by watching famous sci films and taking out all the main sci fi and telling tales from whatever was left over. He has a book coming out soon of poems composed from the incompletion of memories in recall. He lives with his soul mate Lisa and his awesome cat Samson.

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Presenting HaCCS Lab at UCLA DH Infrastructure Conference

Today, Mark Marino will be presenting a tour of the HaCCS Lab at the UCLA Digital Humanities Infrastructure conference.

The tour emphasizes ways to harness existing resources in order to call-forth a virtual lab (with shout-outs to Lori Emerson, ELO, and HASTAC, among others).

Here’s a link to the tour if you wish to go on the self-guided version.  In-person tours are available by appointment via SnapChat.

HaCCS Lab Co-founders Mark Marino, Tara McPherson, & Craig Dietrich

HaCCS Lab Co-founders Mark Marino, Tara McPherson, & Craig Dietrich

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Maria Goicoechea discusses E-Lit in Espana

Digital Literary Studies in Español .
María Goicoechea
University Complutense of Madrid 
Tuesday, Nov. 15, 4pm, WPH B36 
(a talk in English)
The HaCCS Lab is sponsoring a talk by María Goicoechea on contemporary digital literary studies in Spanish language works.  She will be presenting her recent research in the creation of digital editions of works of literature in Spanish.
María Goicoechea has a degree in English Philology from the University Complutense of Madrid and a Master’s Degree in Intercultural Communication from the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). Her doctoral dissertation is entitled The Reader in Cyberspace: A Literary Ethnography of Cyberculture (2004). Currently, she is an associate professor in the English Department at the University Complutense of Madrid (UCM). Her research interests include literary theory, ethnography, and cyberculture. She is a member of LEETHI Research Group (UCM), and of HERMENEIA (Universitat de Barcelona), two interdisciplinary research groups dedicated to the study of literature and computers. Her CV can be found here: http://pendientedemigracion.ucm.es/info/leethi/1_nav/cvs/maria_goicoechea_cv.php
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CCS at SLSA 2016

Several HaCCS Lab affiliates will be presenting new research in Critical Code Studies at the 2016 Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts (SLSA) conference in Atlanta (November 3-6, 2016). Below are the panel abstracts of these papers that extend the work of CCS in innovative ways.

Panel 10F: Saturday, November 5, 1:30 PM-3:30 PM Ansley 6 (projector, screen, and speakers)
Critical Code Studies and Creativity
Without questions, computer source code has been an explosive tool of creativity for over fifty years. However, in the realm of code, meaning is created in ways distinct from and yet complementary to other symbolic systems. Using the methods of Critical Code Studies, this panel will explore the meaning created through approaches to code. To begin, we will examine the ways code through its own rhetorical structures enables argumentation in critical and creative inquiry. As a means of rhetorical expression, we will then consider code as a means of social engagement. Since expression in code is constrained by programming languages, we will also examine the ways in which languages themselves facilitate or inhibit that expression. Finally, we will consider the way rule-based play in Live Action Role Play (larp) can be understood when situated as encoded play and read through the tools of CCS. These four presentations will give way to a discussion with the audience of the implications of regarding code as a means of communication.  Chair: Mark Marino

Continue reading

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Monthly Reading Group

The HaCCS Lab is sponsoring a monthly digital literature reading group at the University of Southern California.  Meetings will be held in the East Asian Reading Rooms of Doheny Library.

The goal of the meetings is to explore works of digital literature, considering both the experience of them and their underlying software and code.  We will explore a wide range of genres from poetry generators to interactive fiction to bots and apps.

All are welcome to these events which are free and open to the public.

To join the mailing list, contact Mark Marino.

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CCSWG16 Week 1 Round-up

Week 1: 
Our Code Literacy week was led by Chris Lindgren, Sneha Veeragoudar Harrell, and Annette Vee. Chris began the week by asking us to examine three related texts and to try to read the code, reflecting on the limits of the code alone for an understanding of its development. Lindgren asked among other questions what context gets obscured in code? Sneha discussed her work bringing coding skills to marginalized groups and asked us to reflect on coding as a form of agency.  Annette extended those questions by asking what knowledge of coding was necessary for our participation in a democratic society. Ben Grosser, Hayley Steele, Judy Malloy, Gregory Bringman, and Clarissa Lee also contributed to the week’s discussion.  It’s not too late for you to join this discussion, too!
The Code Critiques launched this week were:
Recreating the 1990 GW-BASIC version of its name was Penelope by Judy Malloy
Alliance LARP rule set: Code that Runs on Humans? by Hayley Steele
Every Javascript Variable from Amazon.com by Jeff Thompson
Reddit’s Hot Sort by Dylan De Jong
Week 2: 
David Berry is leading us through an exploration of Joseph Weizenbaum’s ELIZA/DOCTOR ported into BASIC. Please, join us in this collaborative annotation which we will pick up again in Week 4.

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Launching CCSWG16

Critical Code Studies Working Group 2016
Jan 18 t0 Feb 14, 2016 

The 4th biannual Critical Code Studies Working Group (CCSWG), Jan 18-Feb 14th is underway, and you are invited to join us for explorations of code in culture and culture through code.

CCSWG is the major online think tank for Critical Code Studies, a hub of dialogue and collaborative inquiry that generates major thrust in the reading of code.  This marks the 10 year anniversary of the publication of the article that named this subfield and the launch of the second decade of scholarship.  The Working Groups have been the principal site of developments in this area, and this one is positioned to continue that tradition.

The threads from the first were published in electronic book review, as will the threads from the subsequent CCSWGs.  Past discussions have led to books (10 PRINT), essays, and conference panels. Join us for explorations for the intersections of computer source code and the humanities.

Major Topics:

Schedule: Jan 18-Feb 14
Week 1: Jan 18: Code Literacies: Annette Vee, Sneha Veeragoudar Harrell, Chris Lindgren
Week 2: Jan 25: Archaeologies of Code: Reading ELIZA: David M Berry
Week 3: Feb 1: Politics and Ethics of Code: James Brown, Jr. and Kevin Brock
Week 4: Feb 8: Scalar/Workbench books: all

Coordinated by Jeremy Douglass and Mark C. Marino with Viola Lasmana and Ashley Champagne

Sponsored by the Humanities and Critical Code Studies Lab (USC) and Transcriptions Center (UCSB)

To join: Please, contact Mark C Marino if you would like to join the Working Group.  email: markcmarino [at] gmail. 

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CFP 2016 Critical Code Studies Working Group (Jan 2, Jan 11-Feb 7)

Critical Code Studies Working Group 2016

Jan 18 t0 Feb 14, 2016 [updated]

Announcing the 4th biannual Critical Code Studies Working Group, Jan 11-Feb 7, online. CCSWG is the major online think tank for Critical Code Studies, a hub of dialogue and collaborative inquiry that generates major thrust in the reading of code.  This marks the 10 year anniversary of the publication of the article that named this subfield and the launch of the second decade of scholarship.  The Working Groups have been the principal site of developments in this area, and this one is positioned to continue that tradition.

The threads from the first were published in electronic book review, as will the threads from the subsequent CCSWGs.  Past discussions have led to books (10 PRINT), essays, and conference panels. Join us for explorations for the intersections of computer source code and the humanities.

Major Topics:

Schedule: Jan 18-Feb 14
Week 1: Jan 18: Code Literacies: Annette Vee, Sneha Veeragoudar Harrell, Chris Lindgren
Week 2: Jan 25: Reading ELIZA: David M Berry
Week 3: Feb 1: Politics and Ethics of Code: James Brown, Jr. and Kevin Brock
Week 4: Feb 8: Scalar/Workbench books: us/all

Coordinated by Jeremy Douglass and Mark C. Marino with Viola Lasmana and Ashley Champagne

To apply to join the working group, please send an application to markcmarino at gmail by Jan 2 including:

  • Name:
  • Institutional Affiliation:
  • Past work or study related to Critical Code Studies
  • (Recommended) Proposed Code Critique thread or related discussion
  • Brief Bio

A “code critique” is a segment of code (or entire program) you wish to offer for discussion by the working group.  You can see examples of code critiques in these HASTAC threads.

Notice of acceptance will be given by Jan 5. Send applications to markcmarino at g- mail dot com.

CCSWG is sponsored by the Humanities and Critical Code Studies (HaCCS) Lab at the University of Southern California. http://haccslab.com  Twitter: @haccs

For more information, contact Mark Marino.

 

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Announcing a New Platform for Critical Code Studies

Announcing ACLS Workbench: A new site for collaborative Critical Code Studies!
Site: http://scalar.usc.edu/aclsworkbench

ACLS Workbench Tour from Mark Marino on Vimeo.

ACLS Workbench is a new platform for collaborative research, which enables scholars to create, join, or clone online arguments enhanced with multimedia content.

http://scalar.usc.edu/aclsworkbench

ACLS Workbench has two novel features: the “join” feature and the “clone” feature. The join features allows new collaborators to apply to join your research project. The clone feature allows scholars to copy entire books so they can build their own interpretations.

The platform also enables the annotation of source code.  Participants in CCSWG14 were invited to test this platform, and from that group, we have forthcoming collaborative readings of code.

ACLS Workbench is built on the ANVC Scalar platform, which offers special affordances for presenting multimedia content and custom hyperlinked paths through material. Combined with features to annotate video and code along with Workbench’s affordances, this new platform offers a powerful tool for collaboration. (Video introduction of the site: http://youtu.be/twMliWAt5KA )

As a demonstration of Workbench, we are launching Reading Project, the online companion to our recent book: Reading Project: A Collaborative Analysis of William Poundstone’s Project for Tachistoscope {Bottomless Pit just published by University of Iowa Press.

http://scalar.usc.edu/aclsworkbench/reading-project/

The book offers a collaborative investigation of one work of digital literature, modeling an argument for more intensive collaboration in the digital humanities by combining scholars who draw their methodologies from visual analytics, Critical Code Studies, media archaeology and others. The ACLS Workbench site presents our arguments and findings in an online multimedia format. Crucially, future scholars may clone our online book and use its assets to build new arguments.

The book argues: “Collaboration can produce understandings that are greater than the sum of their parts. Conversely, collaboration can foster new ways of understanding what we do as critics, scholars, and readers. Such reflection and innovation is vital not only to literary criticism but also to the future of the humanities more generally” (137). Workbench was designed to present and promote these collaborations.

ACLS Workbench was designed by Jessica Pressman (San Diego State U), Mark C Marino (USC), and Jeremy Douglass (UCSB) as part of an ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship in collaboration with Lucas Miller, Craig Dietrich, and Erik Loyer. The platform is online and freely available. The demonstration book Reading Project was developed with the kind permission of William Poundstone and the assistance of Elizabeth Shayne.

Contact Us:

Jessica Pressman, jessicapressman0 at gmail
Mark Marino, markcmarino at gmail
Jeremy Douglass, jeremydouglass at gmail

For more on Scalar, see: http://scalar.usc.edu

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